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Programming the World Wide Web

Programming the World Wide Web

International Edition
3rd Edition

Robert Sebesta

Jun 2005, Paperback, 672 pages
ISBN13: 9780321312570
ISBN10: 0321312570
For orders to USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand or Japan visit your local Pearson website
This product has been replaced by Programming the World Wide Web: Pearson New International Edition
£48.99

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Programming the World Wide Web provides a comprehensive introduction to the programming tools and skills required for building and maintaining server sites on the Web, as well as teaching students how to develop platform-independent sites. It takes a holistic approach, and readers are guided through concepts relating to client-side and server-side programming including ASP.NET using C#, Javascript, java servlets, JSP, Perl/CGI Java Applets, XHTML and XML. This book is intended for readers who have experience programming with an object-oriented language.

1Fundamentals

1.1 A Brief Introduction to the Internet

1.2 The World Wide Web

1.3 Web Browsers

1.4 Web Servers

1.5 Uniform Resource Locators

1.6 Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions

1.7 The Hypertext Transfer Protocol

1.8 The Web Programmerís Toolbox

1.9 Summary

1.10 Review Questions

1.11 Exercises

2Introduction to XHTML

2.1 Origins and Evolution of HTML and XHTML

2.2 Basic Syntax

2.3 Standard XHTML Document Structure

2.4 Basic Text Formatting

2.5 Images

2.6 Hypertext Links

2.7 Lists

2.8 Tables

2.9 Forms

2.10 Frames

2.11 Summary

2.12 Review Questions

2.13 Exercises

3Cascading Style Sheets

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Levels of Style Sheets

3.3 Style Specification Formats

3.4 Selector Formats

3.5 Property Value Forms

3.6 Font Properties

3.7 List Properties

3.8 Alignment of Text

3.9 Margins

3.10 Color

3.11 Background Images

3.12 Borders

3.13 The <span> and <div> Tags

3.14 Summary

3.15 Review Questions

3.16 Exercises

4The Basics of JavaScript

4.1 Overview of JavaScript

4.2 Object Orientation and JavaScript

4.3 General Syntactic Characteristics

4.4 Primitives, Operations, and Expressions

4.5 Screen Output and Keyboard Input

4.6 Control Statements

4.7 Object Creation and Modification

4.8 Arrays

4.9 Functions

4.10 An Example

4.11 Constructors

4.12 Pattern Matching Using Regular Expressions

4.13 Another Example

4.14 Errors in Scripts

4.15 Summary

4.16 Review Questions

4.17 Exercises

5JavaScript and HTML Documents

5.1 The JavaScript Execution Environment

5.2 The Document Object Model

5.3 Element Access in JavaScript

5.4 Events and Event Handling

5.5 Handling Events from Body Elements

5.6 Handling Events from Button Elements

5.7 Handling Events from Text Boxes and Passwords

5.8 The DOM 2 Event Model

5.9 The navigator Object

5.10 Summary

5.11 Review Questions

5.12 Exercises

6Dynamic Documents with JavaScript

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Element Positioning

6.3 Moving Elements

6.4 Element Visibility

6.5 Changing Colors and Fonts

6.6 Dynamic Content

6.7 Stacking Elements

6.8 Locating the Mouse Cursor

6.9 Reacting to a Mouse Click

6.10 Slow Movement of Elements

6.11 Dragging and Dropping Elements

6.12 Summary

6.13 Review Questions

6.14 Exercises

7Java Applets

7.1 Introduction

7.2 The Primary Applet Activities

7.3 The paintComponent Method

7.4 The <object> Tag

7.5 Applet Parameters

7.6 Simple Graphics

7.7 Color

7.8 Interactive Applets

7.9 Summary

7.10 Review Questions

7.11 Exercises

8Introduction to XML

8.1 Introduction

8.2 The Syntax of XML

8.3 XML Document Structure

8.4 Document Type Definitions

8.5 Namespaces

8.6 XML Schemas

8.7 Displaying Raw XML Documents

8.8 Displaying XML Documents with CSS

8.9 XSLT Style Sheets

8.10 XML Processors

8.11 Summary

8.12 Review Questions

8.13 Exercises

9The Basics of Perl

9.1 Origins and Uses of Perl

9.2 Scalars and Their Operations

9.3 Assignment Statements and Simple Input and Output

9.4 Control Statements

9.5 Fundamentals of Arrays

9.6 Hashes

9.7 References

9.8 Functions

9.9 Pattern Matching

9.10 File Input and Output

9.11 An Example

9.12 Summary

9.13 Review Questions

9.14 Exercises

10Using Perl for CGI Programming

10.1 The Common Gateway Interface

10.2 CGI Linkage

10.3 Query String Format

10.4 The CGI.pm Module

10.5 A Survey Example

10.6 Cookies

10.7 Summary

10.8 Review Questions

10.9 Exercises

11Servlets and Java Server Pages

11.1 Overview of Servlets

11.2 Servlet Details

11.3 A Survey Example

11.4 Storing Information on Clients

11.5 Java Server Pages

11.6 Summary

11.7 Review Questions

11.8 Exercises

12Introduction to PHP

12.1 Origins and Uses of PHP

12.2 Overview of PHP

12.3 General Syntactic Characteristics

12.4 Primitives, Operations, and Expressions

12.5 Output

12.6 Control Statements

12.7 Arrays

12.8 Functions

12.9 Pattern Matching

12.10 Form Handling

12.11 Files

12.12 Cookies

12.13 Session Tracking

12.14 Summary

12.15 Review Questions

12.16 Exercises

13Introduction to ASP.NET

13.1 Overview of the .NET Framework

13.2 Overview of C#

13.3 Introduction to ASP.NET

13.4 ASP.NET Controls

13.5 Summary

13.6 Review Questions

13.7 Exercises

14Database Access through the Web

14.1 Relational Databases

14.2 An Introduction to the Structured Query Language

14.3 Architectures for Database Access

14.4 The MySQL Database System

14.5 Database Access with Perl and MySQL

14.6 Database Access with PHP and MySQL

14.7 Database Access with JDBC and MySQL

14.8 Summary

14.9 Review Questions

14.10 Exercises

Appendix AIntroduction to Java

A.1 Overview of Java

A.2 Data Types and Structures

A.3 Classes, Objects, and Methods

A.4 Interfaces

A.5 Exception Handling

A.6 Summary

Index

  • Client-side technology is covered including HTML, XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, Java applets and XML.
  • Server-side technology is covered including ASP.NET using C#, Perl/CGI, PHP, Java servlets and JSP.
  • A chapter on Web access to relational databases using MySQL with Perl, PHP, and Java servlets.
  • A Brief Introduction to Java Appendix is included for C++ programmers.

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